Growing Beetroot, also Beets

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
    P P P P P          

(Best months for growing Beetroot in USA - Zone 5a regions)

P = Sow seed

  • Easy to grow. Sow in garden. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 45°F and 77°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 8 - 12 inches apart
  • Harvest in 7-10 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Onions, Silverbeet (Swiss Chard), Lettuce, Cabbage, Dwarf Beans, Dill, Peas. Strawberries
  • Avoid growing close to: Asparagus, Carrots, Sweetcorn, Spinach
  • Seedlings before thinning
  • Young beetroot

Soak seeds in water 24 hours before planting so that you can separate the seeds. Thinning is nearly always required as seedlings emerge from a seedball of several seeds. If you don't thin them, you will get a number of rather pathetic plants which don't grow to an edible size. Harvest in 55 - 70 days but will keep in ground for longer.

Keep well-watered as dry beetroot develop a woody and inedible core. Tip from the Italian Gardener ' Make sure the top of the beet's bulb is covered with soil; this keeps the entire bulb the same color and prevents 'corkiness' at the top of the bulb." For tasty and tender beetroot, start harvesting at golfball-size.

Culinary hints - cooking and eating Beetroot

Apart from boiling whole for salads, beetroot roast well, cut in wedges.
They also make a tasty salad grated raw with carrot and a little fresh orange juice.

Your comments and tips

01 Nov 21, Wendy (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
I have had very varied success with growing beetroot. Some will grow quickly and taste so sweet, others in the same garden bed don't even go to seedlings. They are the same seed packet, same variety and same area of garden. Can anyone help. I have tested Ph and they get watered at night every second day if no rain. I am at a loss as to why some do & some don't.
04 Nov 21, Anonymous (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
I grow beetroot from Mar to harvest late Oct. I grow seedlings and plant out and cover with a shade cloth cover for about 2 weeks. I then fertilise with a watering can to give a good uniform fertilising. If required another fertilising later. Space plants about 125mm apart. Rows about 400mm apart. When they have grown about 150-200mm high I even hill the soil around them a bit to support them. I grow DT BROWN Detroit Red Globe from the Reject shops. I find when I boil them to pickle they don't bleed too much. They flesh is still a deep colour. I water each two days in good free draining soil.
14 Aug 21, Jill (USA - Zone 9a climate)
what is the best type of beetroot to plant in zone 9a?
29 Aug 21, (USA - Zone 7b climate)
There is no best type for any region. Just try a variety or two.
22 Feb 21, Charles Bracun (Australia - temperate climate)
what species are quickest to mature?
23 Feb 21, Anonymous (Australia - temperate climate)
Grow the variety you like, does a week or two make any difference ?
14 Feb 21, Herman mhagama (South Africa - Semi-arid climate)
In Tanzania also grow well but market is problem where can we get market in South Africa or else in the world
09 Nov 20, Norma Street (USA - Zone 7a climate)
Can I plant beets now Maryland has mild winters
09 Nov 20, (USA - Zone 7a climate)
You could try, if they fail then stick to the planting guide here.
20 Sep 20, Gordon Slocombe (Australia - temperate climate)
Hi I have grown some really good size beetroot over the years but sometimes they grow like carrots why is this
Showing 1 - 10 of 339 comments

what is the best type of beetroot to plant in zone 9a?

- Jill

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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