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Showing 31 - 60 of 629 comments
Garlic 31 Aug, Anonymous (USA - Zone 3b climate)
Work out if adding to the soil or as a mulch. Google it then.
Pumpkin 27 Aug, alexander (USA - Zone 9b climate)
I read that they can have trouble pollinating without a little help, though I haven't started growing mine yet.
Pumpkin 20 Sep, Ivie Walker (USA - Zone 9a climate)
Because of the heat in zone 9a. Plants have difficulty pollinating when temperatures are 90 degrees or higher. In Southern Nevada temps got to 120 degrees. I plant seeds especially seedlings once temps are below 90 degrees. When temps are high I use Blossom Set to help the fruit to set on
Pumpkin 28 Aug, Anonymous (USA - Zone 6b climate)
If you don't have active bees when they flower then you can hand pollinate. A female flower is only open for a few hours one day, if not pollinated then no pumpkin grows. Google how to do it.
Cucumber 25 Aug, colleen (USA - Zone 10b climate)
Ignore my current zone, I used to live in central NH so I know your cuke season is brief. To me, nothing beats Chicago Pickling (a cheap and excellent heirloom) unless you have lots of disease challenges in your garden, in which case I'd go with Eureka--not quite as tasty, but vigorous. To get crunchy pickles, pick them small, put them in an ice bath right away and then pickle as soon as possible. For refrigerator pickles, calcium chloride helps keep them crunchy. For fermented (half-sours) you keep them crunchy by cutting off the blossom end of the cuke and adding tannins to the jar, from grape, oak, or horseradish leaves. That might help you with refrigerator pickles too. To me, the hardest part can be getting dill and cukes to be ready at the same time!
Celery 24 Aug, Jim S (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Have had cerlery growing from seed since beginning of march 2020 they are still only about 6 inches high and are just starting to look bushy and dark green ..should I move to a more shady place they have been in sun (potted) since day one full sun ......maybe morning sun then shade rest of day ?
Celery 07 Oct, Sandy (USA - Zone 9b climate)
I also live in 9b. I haven’t grown it from seed but will be trying this fall and see what happens. But, I did grow it successfully from store bought celery. I chop the stalks away from the Root base and stick it directly into my raised bed and keep it moist. The leaves first appear from the center of the Root base and continue to grow from the old root. The raised bed is partially shaded and celeryready to harvest in about 3-4 months.
Celery 25 Aug, Anon (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Celery take a long time to grow. After 2 months my seedlings were like 3 week old lettuce. I don't know your climate but we grow them autumn into winter. I will finish picking mine this week (last week of winter- Australia- sob-tropical climate). Maybe a bit of fertiliser to kick them along. They need sunlight. Hope they are in a decent size pot, have a big root system.
Zucchini (also Courgette/Marrow, Summer squash) 24 Aug, Dave (USA - Zone 9b climate)
I cannot seem to get my zucchini to grow. The leaves keep wilting and dying off and so do the sprouts from below. We have a raised compost garden with tomatoes and bell peppers. It has been VERY hot this summer so perhaps I should be watering more? At what times should I water to help the plants the most? Thank you in advance.
Zucchini (also Courgette/Marrow, Summer squash) 25 Aug, Anon (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Take a look at the top of the page at the monthly planting guide, plant Feb Mar April. A lot of vegetables are seasonal so plant at the right time to get the best results. When watering, water low on the edge of the plant not above the flower and do it in the morning. A good watering 3 times a week.
Zucchini (also Courgette/Marrow, Summer squash) 27 Aug, Dave (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Thanks! I'll follow that guidance. I suppose I might have to replant in the Spring then too :)
Cucumber 23 Aug, Nathan (USA - Zone 4a climate)
Wanting to plant cucumbers for pickling next year 2021. Have always bought from another source and would like to do it my self. Want small cucumbers.. any suggestions on which kind? I make refrigerator pickles so want the “Crunch”. Thank you in advance
Cucumber 24 Aug, Anonymous (USA - Zone 3b climate)
Google to find a recommended pickling cue.
Sage (also Common Sage) 23 Aug, Kathleen (USA - Zone 9b climate)
How do I take a cutting from my daughters sage plant? Do I try to root it in water? Thanks
Sage (also Common Sage) 24 Aug, Anonymous (USA - Zone 3b climate)
Take a few pieces and put in water, change the water each 3-4 days. Or break a piece of the plant off with some roots on it and plant in a pot, keep in the shade for a week or two until it is established.
Collards (also Collard greens, Borekale) 20 Aug, Joell (USA - Zone 7a climate)
When to plant collard kale turnip mustard green (Check here www.gardenate.com/plant/Collards?zone=10 and under plant name for the others - Gardenate)
Ginger 19 Aug, DJ (USA - Zone 7b climate)
Can I plant ginger in August?
Ginger 20 Aug, Anon (USA - Zone 7b climate)
The monthly calendar guide at the top of the page has no P T S in it. That means that you probably can't grow it. It needs a warm/hot climate.
Ginger 19 Aug, Liz (New Zealand - temperate climate)
Have a look at this page www.gardenate.com/plant/Ginger?zone=114
Tomato 18 Aug, Jane (USA - Zone 9a climate)
What are the best tomatoes to grow in 9a to slice in salads and sandwiches?
Tomato 19 Aug, (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Look at the different tomatoes on a seed selling website that might suit your climate. Most varieties would grow in your area probably. The more important thing is plant them the right time of year.
Carrot 17 Aug, Fran (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Will it be too late to sow these in early September?
Tomato 17 Aug, Jerry nordin (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Planted indeterminate in April hard freeze late in may covered plants at night until night temps reached 60f. Planted in elevated box planters. Is this enough soil for the roots plants never really produced. Im looking at the last tomato of the year 8-17-20.
Tomato 19 Aug, Anonymous (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Tomatoes need good rich deep soil. Dig your soil about 40cm deep x about 60cm across. Put some fertiliser in the bottom of the hole and mix with some soil. Keep doing this until the hole is only 10cm deep. Put some Epsom salts in the hole also. When the plant has grown 60-80cm high fill the soil in around the plant and even hill it up a bit. Put some compost/mulch around the plant. Tomatoes need a good deep watering 2-3 times a week.
Okra (also Ladyfinger, gumbo) 16 Aug, Rachelle Brunetta (USA - Zone 10b climate)
I am in San Diego zone 10b, is it too late to plant okra in mid August ? (Gardenate : Check here www.gardenate.com/plant/Okra?zone=100 )
Okra (also Ladyfinger, gumbo) 09 Sep, Sandra (USA - Zone 10b climate)
You can continue to plant okra so long as your weather stays warm to hot, so I just planted out 3 plants about two inches tall, they should produce until it’s too cold for them, they may live through the cold and maybe not. But do plant them where they get full sun all day whether the weather is cold or hot, they tolerate drought, very tough plant. Freeze anything you don’t eat right away. Pick often to produce more.
Okra (also Ladyfinger, gumbo) 22 Aug, colleen (USA - Zone 10b climate)
Hi! I'm also in San Diego 10b. Sometimes my okra makes it all the way through the winter and sometimes it doesn't (same with my eggplants), as they're both perennials that hate frost. So much of it is luck--or where they're planted in the yard. If they're near my South wall they always make it. I say give it a shot! They'll grow FAST at first, much faster than when planted in March. You'll get a small harvest in November, and then the plants will not grow much until the weather warms back up in Feb/March, if they make it. I suggest cutting them to 1-2 feet tall in late November and covering them with garden fleece anytime light frost is threatened. If they survive the winter they'll come back in a bushier form and you'll be way ahead for next year.
Okra (also Ladyfinger, gumbo) 18 Aug, (USA - Zone 10b climate)
Give it a try if you like. Look at your local conditions. They require warm/hot conditions by the look of it. If you don't produce a good crop then next year plant earlier as they suggest here.
Garlic 11 Aug, Dan (USA - Zone 7a climate)
I bought a pack of two christopher ranch organic garlic from grocery store. How do I know if it's soft neck or hard neck.
Garlic 24 Oct, Pita (USA - Zone 9a climate)
Commercial garlic is treated with something that keeps it from sprouting. I always grow my own garlic and I found out it's the softneck kind because it doesn't make scapes. Softneck garlic types have bigger cloves and last longer than hardneck types. I believe Christoper Ranch garlic is hardneck, but I'm not sure.
Showing 31 - 60 of 629 comments
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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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