Growing Rhubarb

Rheum rhabarbarum : Polygonaceae / the dock family

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
      P                

(Best months for growing Rhubarb in USA - Zone 5a regions)

  • P = Plant crowns
  • Easy to grow. Plant pieces of rhizome or roots 8 - 10 cm (3 - 4 in.) deep. Best planted at soil temperatures between 41°F and 68°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 35 inches apart
  • Harvest in approximately 1 years. You will have a stronger plant if you leave it for about a year before using..
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Brassicas (Cabbage, Broccoli, Cauliflower, etc)

Your comments and tips

18 Jan 22, Washingtonian in Texas (USA - Zone 8b climate)
I am from East Washington but moved to Texas. Rhubarb is one of my favorite things and when I was growing up in my Washington hometown, my grandma had a huge, really old rhubarb plant that had been producing stalks since before I was born. And I would just pull a stalk out of the ground, wash off with her hose, and snack on whenever I felt like it. Well, I married a military man, and he got stationed in San Antonio and then he got offered a civilian job here, so we are now here to stay. I would really like to grow rhubarb in my garden, especially because I can't even find it here in the store (and the only two times I have found it fresh in the store, the cashiers didn't even know what it was. I kid you not. That's how rare rhubarb is here, so uncommon that the locals don't even know what it looks like as a fresh vegetable). Anyway, does anyone know how I might grow rhubarb here in my new climate? I really miss it. Thanks!
02 Sep 22, Tiffles (USA - Zone 8a climate)
Woo. You have it harder than I do. Thisishwat I read and I am trying some in 8a soon. Shaded during summer, good ventilation for air. Plants may shade it but you may need shade cloth. You MAY need to keep it in a big planter and move it in if you have heat wave. We don't really have big heat waves here in NC, but I lived near Austin, TX area and I remember those heat waves....
18 Mar 22, Dorth Her (USA - Zone 8b climate)
Where did you find rhubarb seeds/crowns? What variety are you growing? I’ve been looking and the websites I’ve been able to find different varieties they have sold out. I really want and can’t find is the German Wine variety. Any recommendations?
19 Jan 22, Liz (New Zealand - sub-tropical climate)
It's probably too hot and dry in Texas to grow rhubarb in a garden bed. If you have a pot that you can move into shade, you might be lucky.
10 Sep 21, Helen (USA - Zone 10a climate)
Does rhubarb have to be out of sun lite? Can it grow here in San Diego?
14 Sep 21, (USA - Zone 5a climate)
Most plants need lots of sunlight. Check what Climate Zone San Diego is in the climate zone section here and look it up if you can grow it.
18 May 21, LORI (USA - Zone 9a climate)
Can I grow rhubarb in zone 9A?
16 Sep 21, John Mitchell (USA - Zone 10a climate)
No it will not I have tried a couple times. Its to hot in the summer sorry.
02 May 21, Trish I. (USA - Zone 7b climate)
We have very recently (April) moved some rhubarb plants that originated from my FIL's family homestead many years ago, from Denver CO to SC. I desperately want to keep these alive, mostly for my husband. Any advice? Our ground is hard as a rock in most spots and has a lot of clay, so figured I need to keep them in pots. How big of a pot do I need, should I be sure to put them on the side of the house where there's mostly only morning sun, in order to continue the "family line", should I try and gather seeds from the plant for the following year? Thanks!
06 May 21, Laura Ellington (USA - Zone 8a climate)
you really are better off putting them in a raised garden bed with mixed clean top soil, lots of compost, peat moss, blood meal, and a slow release fertilizer. Rhubarb get very large and can live for many years and their root systems can get quite large, keeping them in pots will restrict their growth and you will have to water more often and continually use fertilizer more often then them being in the ground.
Showing 11 - 20 of 38 comments

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